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HIV Testing Recommendations

	HIV Screening. Standard Care. Testing and Linking African Americans and Hispanic/Latino Patients to Care.

	tlc_revisedRecommentations_thumbnail_200x143.jpgTo help address disparities in HIV screening and early diagnosis of infection, and link patients to essential medical services, the CDC developed HIV testing recommendations for all health care providers who practice in settings where diagnostic and screening tests are performed.

Key Points of CDC’s HIV Testing Recommendations

  • HIV screening for all patients ages 13 to 64 as part of routine health care. The patient is informed that testing will be done unless he or she declines, a process known as opt-out screening.
  • Annual rescreening (at a minimum) for patients at high risk for HIV infection. These include injection drug users and their sex partners, people who exchange sex for money or drugs, sex partners of HIV-infected people, and anyone who has had or whose sex partners have had more than one sex partner since their most recent HIV test. For people with these risk factors, CDC sexually transmitted disease treatment guidelines recommend screening every 3 to 6 months for HIV.
  • HIV screening as part of routine prenatal screening tests for all pregnant women. The patient is informed that testing will be done unless declined.

The recommendations simplify the testing process and are supported by many organizations, including the leading organizations serving ethnic and minority health care providers

In Support of CDC’s Recommendations HIV Testing Recommendations
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)
  • Everyone aged 15 to 65 should be screened for HIV infection. Teens younger than age 15 and adults older than 65 also should be screened if they are at increased risk for HIV infection.
  • All pregnant women, including women in labor who do not know their HIV status, should be screened for HIV infection.
For more details >>
American College of Physicians (ACP)
  • Clinicians adopt routine screening for HIV and encourage patients to be tested.
  • Clinicians determine the need for repeat screening on an individual basis.
For more details >>
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Committee Opinion
  • Routine HIV screening recommended for women aged 19–64
  • Targeted screening for women with risk factors outside of that age range
  • OB/GYNs annually review patients’ risk factors for HIV and assess the need for retesting.
For more details >>
National Medical Association (NMA)
  • The NMA HIV/AIDS Testing and Treatment Consensus Panel strongly supports the use of routine testing consistent with the CDC recommendations.
For more details >>
National Hispanic Medical Association (NHMA)
  • Recognizes that Hispanics/Latinos are disproportionately affected by HIV.
  • Supports the use of routine testing consistent with the CDC recommendations and recognizes the importance of prompt linkage to care for those who test HIV positive.
National Black Nurses Association (NBNA)
  • Recognizes that Blacks/African Americans are disproportionately affected by HIV.
  • Supports the use of routine testing consistent with the CDC recommendations and recognizes the importance of prompt linkage to care for those who test HIV positive.
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