Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Who Should NOT Get Vaccinated with these Vaccines?

Because of age, health conditions, or other factors, some people should not get certain vaccines or should wait before getting them. Read the guidelines below for each vaccine.

Adenovirus vaccine

Some people should not get adenovirus vaccine.

  • Anyone with a severe (life-threatening) allergy to any component of the vaccine. Tell the doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Pregnant women or nursing mothers.
  • Anyone who is unable to swallow the vaccine tablets whole without chewing them.
  • Anyone younger than 17 or older than 50 years of age.

A woman who learns she was pregnant when she got the vaccine, or becomes pregnant within 6 weeks after vaccination, should contact the Adenovirus Vaccine Pregnancy Registry at 1-866-790-4549. This will help us learn how pregnant women and their babies respond to the vaccine.

Note: Adenovirus vaccine is approved for use only among military personnel.

This information was taken directly from the Adenovirus VIS
(This information taken from Adenovirus VIS dated 7/14/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Anthrax vaccine

Some people should not get anthrax vaccine.
  • Anyone who has had a serious allergic reaction to a previous dose of anthrax vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe allergy to any vaccine component should not get a dose. Tell your provider if you have any severe allergies, including latex.
  • If you have ever had Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS), your provider might recommend not getting anthrax vaccine.
  • If you have a moderate or severe illness your provider might ask you to wait until you recover to get the vaccine. People with mild illness can usually be vaccinated.
  • Vaccination may be recommended for pregnant women who have been exposed to anthrax and are at risk of developing inhalation disease. Nursing mothers may safely be given anthrax vaccine.

This information was taken directly from the Anthrax VIS
(This information taken from Anthrax VIS dated 3/10/10. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

DTaP vaccine (Diphtheria, Tetanus, & acellular Pertussis)

Some children should not get DTaP vaccine or should wait.
  • Children with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. But children who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting DTaP vaccine.
  • Any child who had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of DTaP should not get another dose.
  • Any child who suffered a brain or nervous system disease within 7 days after a dose of DTaP should not get another dose.
  • Talk with your doctor if your child:
    • had a seizure or collapsed after a dose of DTaP
    • cried non-stop for 3 hours or more after a dose of DTaP
    • had a fever over 105 degrees Fahrenheit after a dose of DTaP.

Ask your health care provider for more information. Some of these children should not get another dose of pertussis vaccine, but may get a vaccine without pertussis, called DT. DTaP should not be given to anyone 7 years of age or older.

This information was taken directly from the DTaP VIS
(This information taken from DTaP VIS dated 5/17/07. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Hepatitis A vaccine

Some people should not get hepatitis A vaccine or should wait.
  • Anyone who has ever had a severe (life-threatening) allergic reaction to a previous dose of hepatitis A vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe (life-threatening) allergy to any vaccine component should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies, including a severe allergy to latex. All hepatitis A vaccines contain alum and some hepatitis A vaccines contain 2-phenoxyethanol.
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should probably wait until they recover. Ask your doctor. People with a mild illness can usually get the vaccine.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant. Because hepatitis A vaccine is inactivated (killed), the risk to a pregnant woman or her unborn baby is believed to be very low. But your doctor can weigh any theoretical risk from the vaccine against the need for protection.

This information was taken directly from the Hepatitis A VIS
(This information taken from Hepatitis A VIS dated 10/25/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Hepatitis B vaccine

Who should not get hepatitis B vaccine?
  • Anyone with a life-threatening allergy to yeast, or to any other component of the vaccine, should not get hepatitis B vaccine. Tell your provider if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose of hepatitis B vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill when a dose of vaccine is scheduled should probably wait until they recover before getting the vaccine.

Your doctor can give you more information about these precautions.

Note: You might be asked to wait 28 days before donating blood after getting hepatitis B vaccine. This is because the screening test could mistake vaccine in the bloodstream (which is not infectious) for hepatitis B infection.

This information was taken directly from the Hepatitis B VIS
(This information taken from Hepatitis B VIS dated 2/2/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Hib vaccine

Hib vaccine should not be given to infants younger than 6 weeks of age.

Tell your doctor:

  • If the patient has any severe (life-threatening) allergies. If the patient has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of Hib vaccine, or has a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, he or she may be advised not to get a dose.
  • If the patient is not feeling well. Your doctor might suggest waiting until the patient feels better. But you should come back.

This information was taken directly from the Hib VIS
(This information taken from Hib VIS dated 02/04/14. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

HPV-Cervarix (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine

Some people should not get HPV vaccine or should wait.
  • Anyone who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any component of HPV vaccine, or to a previous dose of HPV vaccine, should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if the person getting vaccinated has any severe allergies, including an allergy to latex.
  • HPV vaccine is not recommended for pregnant women. However, receiving HPV vaccine when pregnant is not a reason to consider terminating the pregnancy. Women who are breast feeding may get the vaccine.

    Any woman who learns she was pregnant when she got this HPV vaccine is encouraged to contact the manufacturer’s HPV in pregnancy registry at 888-452-9622. This will help us learn how pregnant women respond to the vaccine.

  • People who are mildly ill when a dose of HPV vaccine is planned can still be vaccinated. People with a moderate or severe illness should wait until they are better.

This information was taken directly from the HPV-Cervarix VIS
(This information taken from HPV VIS dated 5/3/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

HPV-Gardasil (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine

Some people should not get HPV vaccine or should wait.
  • Anyone who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any component of HPV vaccine, or to a previous dose of HPV vaccine, should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if the person getting vaccinated has any severe allergies, including an allergy to yeast.
  • HPV vaccine is not recommended for pregnant women. However, receiving HPV vaccine when pregnant is not a reason to consider terminating the pregnancy. Women who are breast feeding may get the vaccine.
  • People who are mildly ill when a dose of HPV vaccine is planned can still be vaccinated. People with a moderate or severe illness should wait until they are better.

This information was taken directly from the HPV-Gardasil VIS
(This information taken from HPV VIS dated 5/17/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Influenza (inactivated) vaccine

Some people should not get inactivated influenza vaccine or should wait.

Tell the person who gives you the vaccine:

  • If you have any severe, life-threatening allergies. If you ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of flu vaccine, or have a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, including (for example) an allergy to gelatin, antibiotics, or eggs, you may be advised not to get vaccinated. Most, but not all, types of flu vaccine contain a small amount of egg protein.
  • If you ever had Guillain-Barré Syndrome (a severe paralyzing illness, also called GBS). Some people with a history of GBS should not get this vaccine. This should be discussed with your doctor.
  • If you are not feeling well.  It is usually okay to get flu vaccine when you have a mild illness, but you might be advised to wait until you feel better.  You should come back when you are better.

This information was taken directly from the Inactivated Influenza VIS
(This information taken from Inactivated Influenza VIS dated 8/19/14. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Influenza (live) vaccine

Some people should not receive LAIV.

Tell the person who gives you the vaccine:

  • If you have any severe, life-threatening allergies, including (for example) an allergy to gelatin or antibiotics.  If you ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of flu vaccine, or have a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, you should not get vaccinated.
  • If you ever had Guillain-Barré Syndrome (a severe paralyzing illness, also called GBS). Some people with a history of GBS should not get this vaccine. This should be discussed with your doctor.
  • If you have long-term health problems, such as certain heart, breathing, kidney, liver, or nervous system problems, your doctor can help you decide if you should get LAIV.
  • If you have gotten any other vaccines in the past 4 weeks, or if you are not feeling well.  It is usually okay to get flu vaccine when you have a mild illness, but you might be advised to wait until you feel better.  You should come back when you are better.
  • You should get the flu shot instead of the nasal spray if you:
    • are pregnant
    • have a weakened immune system
    • are allergic to eggs
    • are a young child with asthma or wheezing problems
    • are a child or adolescent on long-term aspirin therapy
    • will provide care for, or visit someone, within the next 7 days who needs special care for an extremely weakened immune system (ask your health care provider)
    • have taken influenza antiviral medications in the past 48 hours

The person giving you the vaccine can give you more information.

This information was taken directly from the Live Influenza VIS
(This information taken from Live Influenza VIS dated 8/19/14. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

JE Ixiaro (Japanese Encephalitis) vaccine

Some people should not get JE vaccine.
  • Anyone who has had a severe (life-threatening) allergic reaction to a dose of JE vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe (life threatening) allergy to any component of JE vaccine should not get the vaccine.

    Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies that you know of.

  • Pregnant women should usually not get JE vaccine. If you are pregnant, check with your doctor.

If you will be traveling for fewer than 30 days, especially if you will be staying in urban areas, tell your doctor. You might not need the vaccine.

This information was taken directly from the Japanese Encephalitis VIS
(This information taken from Japanese Encephalitis VIS dated 1/24/14. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella ) vaccine

Some people should not get MMR vaccine or should wait.
  • Anyone who has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to the antibiotic neomycin, or any other component of MMR vaccine, should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose of MMR or MMRV vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Some people who are sick at the time the shot is scheduled may be advised to wait until they recover before getting MMR vaccine.
  • Pregnant women should not get MMR vaccine. Pregnant women who need the vaccine should wait until after giving birth. Women should avoid getting pregnant for 4 weeks after vaccination with MMR vaccine.
  • Tell your doctor if the person getting the vaccine:
    • Has HIV/AIDS, or another disease that affects the immune system
    • Is being treated with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids
    • Has any kind of cancer
    • Is being treated for cancer with radiation or drugs
    • Has ever had a low platelet count (a blood disorder)
    • Has gotten another vaccine within the past 4 weeks
    • Has recently had a transfusion or received other
      blood products

    Any of these might be a reason to not get the vaccine, or delay vaccination until later.

This information was taken directly from the MMR VIS
(This information taken from MMR VIS dated 4/20/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

MMRV (Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella) vaccine

Children should not get MMRV vaccine if they:
  • Have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose of MMRV vaccine, or to either MMR or varicella vaccine.
  • Have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine, including gelatin or the antibiotic neomycin. Tell the doctor if your child has any severe allergies.
  • Have HIV/AIDS, or another disease that affects the immune system.
  • Are being treated with drugs that affect the immune system, including high doses of oral steroids for 2 weeks or longer.
  • Have any kind of cancer.
  • Are being treated for cancer with radiation or drugs.
Check with your doctor if the child:
  • Has a history of seizures, or has a parent, brother or sister with a history of seizures.
  • Has a parent, brother or sister with a history of immune system problems.
  • Has ever had a low platelet count, or another blood disorder.
  • Recently had a transfusion or received other blood products.
  • Might be pregnant.

Children who are moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting MMRV vaccine. Children who are only mildly ill may usually get the vaccine.

Ask your provider for more information.

This information was taken directly from the MMRV VIS
(This information taken from MMRV VIS dated 5/21/10. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Meningococcal vaccine

Some people should not get meningococcal vaccine or should wait.
  • Anyone who has ever had a severe (life-threatening) allergic reaction to a previous dose of MCV4 or MPSV4 vaccine should not get another dose of either vaccine.
  • Anyone who has a severe (life-threatening) allergy to any vaccine component should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should probably wait until they recover. Ask your doctor. People with a mild illness can usually get the vaccine.
  • Meningococcal vaccines may be given to pregnant women. MCV4 is a fairly new vaccine and has not been studied in pregnant women as much as MPSV4 has. It should be used only if clearly needed. The manufacturers of MCV4 maintain pregnancy registries for women who are vaccinated while pregnant.

Except for children with sickle cell disease or without a working spleen, meningococcal vaccines may be given at the same time as other vaccines.

This information was taken directly from the Meningococcal VIS
(This information taken from Meningococcal VIS dated 10/14/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

PCV13 (Pneumococcal Conjugate) vaccine

Some children should not get PCV13 or should wait.

Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a dose of this vaccine, to an early pneumococcal vaccine called PCV7 (or Prevnar), or to any vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid (for example, DTaP) should not get PCV13.

Anyone with a severe allergy to any component of PCV13 should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if the person being vaccinated has any severe allergies.

If the person scheduled for vaccination is sick, your doctor might decide to reschedule the shot on another day.

This information was taken directly from the PCV13 VIS
(This information taken from PCV13 VIS dated 2/27/2013. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

PPV23 (Pneumococcal Polysaccharide) vaccine

Some people should not get PPSV or should wait:
  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to PPSV should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe allergy to any component of a vaccine should not get that vaccine. Tell your provider if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill when the shot is scheduled may be asked to wait until they recover before getting the vaccine. Someone with a mild illness can usually be vaccinated.
  • Although there is no evidence that PPSV is harmful to either a pregnant woman or to her fetus, as a precaution, women with conditions that put them at risk for pneumococcal disease should be vaccinated before becoming pregnant, if possible.

This information was taken directly from the PPSV VIS
(This information taken from PPSV VIS dated 10/6/09. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Polio vaccine

Some people should not get IPV or should wait.

These people should not get IPV:

  • Anyone with a life-threatening allergy to any component of IPV, including the antibiotics neomycin, streptomycin or polymyxin B, should not get polio vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who has a severe allergic reaction to a polio shot should not get another one.

These people should wait:

  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting polio vaccine. People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated.

Ask your health care provider for more information.

This information was taken directly from the IPV VIS
(This information taken from IPV VIS dated 11/08/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Rabies vaccine

Talk with a doctor before getting rabies vaccine if you:
  1. ever had a serious (life-threatening) allergic reaction to a previous dose of rabies vaccine, or to any component of the vaccine; tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies,
  2. have a weakened immune system because of:
    • HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system,
    • treatment with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids,
    • cancer, or cancer treatment with radiation or drugs.

If you have a minor illness, such as a cold, you can be vaccinated. If you are moderately or severely ill, you should probably wait until you recover before getting a routine (non-exposure) dose of rabies vaccine.

If you have been exposed to rabies virus, you should get the vaccine regardless of any other illnesses you may have.

This information was taken directly from the Rabies VIS
(This information taken from Rabies VIS dated 10/6/09. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Rotavirus vaccine

Some people should not get this vaccine.
  • A baby who has had a severe (life-threatening) allergic reaction to a dose of rotavirus vaccine should not get another dose.
  • A baby who has a severe (life-threatening) allergy to any component of rotavirus vaccine should not get the vaccine.
  • Tell your doctor if your baby has any severe  allergies that you know of, including a severe allergy to latex.
  • Babies with “severe combined immunodeficiency” (SCID) should not get rotavirus vaccine.
  • Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called “intussusception” should not get rotavirus vaccine.
  • Babies who are mildly ill can probably get the vaccine today. Babies who are moderately or severely ill should probably wait until they recover. This includes babies with moderate or severe diarrhea or vomiting.
  • Check with your doctor if your baby’s immune system is weakened because of:
    • HIV/AIDS, or any other disease that affects the immune system
    • treatment with drugs such as long-term steroids
    • cancer, or cancer treatment with x-rays or drugs

This information was taken directly from the Rotavirus VIS
(This information taken from Rotavirus VIS dated 8/26/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Shingles (Herpes Zoster) vaccine

Some people should not get shingles vaccine or should wait.

A person should not get shingles vaccine who:

  • has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to gelatin, the antibiotic neomycin, or any other component of shingles vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • has a weakened immune system because of current:
    • AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system,
    • treatment with drugs that affect the immune system, such as prolonged use of high-dose steroids,
    • cancer treatment such as radiation or chemotherapy,
    • cancer affecting the bone marrow or lymphatic system, such as leukemia or lymphoma.
  • is pregnant, or might be pregnant. Women should not become pregnant until at least 4 weeks after getting shingles vaccines.

Someone with a minor acute illness, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. But anyone with a moderate or severe acute illness should usually wait until they recover before getting the vaccine. This includes anyone with a temperature of 101.3° F or higher.

This information was taken directly from the Shingles VIS
(This information taken from Shingles VIS dated 10/6/09. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Smallpox (Vaccinia) vaccine

This medication guide replaces the Smallpox VIS. It is to be used before one receives the vaccination. Medical Guide for vaccination with ACAM2000 [6 pages] (10/1/09)

Top of Page

Td (Adult Tetanus & Diphtheria) vaccine

Some people should not be vaccinated or should wait.
  • If you ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of any tetanus or diphtheria containing vaccine, OR if you have a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, you should not get Td. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Talk to your doctor if you:
    • have epilepsy or another nervous system problem,
    • had severe pain or swelling after any vaccine containing diphtheria or tetanus,
    • ever had Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS),
    • aren’t feeling well on the day the shot is scheduled.

This information was taken directly from the Td VIS
(This information taken from Td-Tdap VIS dated 2/4/14. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Tdap vaccine (Combined Tetanus, Diphtheria & Pertussis)

  • If you ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of any tetanus, diphtheria, or pertussis containing vaccine, OR if you have a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, you should not get Tdap. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • If you had a coma, or long or multiple seizures within 7 days after a childhood dose of DTP or DTaP, you should not get Tdap, unless a cause other than the vaccine was found. You can still get Td.
  • Talk to your doctor if you:
    • have epilepsy or another nervous system problem,
    • had severe pain or swelling after any vaccine containing diphtheria, tetanus or pertussis,
    • ever had Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS),
    • aren't feeling well on the day the shot is scheduled.

This information was taken directly from the Tdap VIS
(This information taken from Td-Tdap VIS dated 5/9/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Typhoid vaccine

Some people should not get typhoid vaccine or should wait.

Inactivated Typhoid Vaccine (Shot)

  • Should not be given to children younger than 2 years of age.
  • Anyone who has had a severe reaction to a previous dose of this vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe allergy to any component of this vaccine should not get it. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting the vaccine.

Live Typhoid Vaccine (Oral)

  • Should not be given to children younger than 6 years of age.
  • Anyone who has had a severe reaction to a previous dose of this vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe allergy to any component of this vaccine should not get it. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill at the time the vaccine is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting it. Tell your doctor if you have an illness involving vomiting or diarrhea.
  • Anyone whose immune system is weakened should not get this vaccine. They should get the typhoid shot instead. This includes anyone who:
    • has HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system,
    • is being treated with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids, for 2 weeks or longer,
    • has any kind of cancer,
    • is taking cancer treatment with radiation or drugs.
  • Oral typhoid vaccine should not be given until at least 3 days after taking antibiotics.

Ask your doctor or nurse for more information.

This information was taken directly from the Typhoid VIS
(This information taken from Typhoid VIS dated 5/29/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Varicella (chickenpox) vaccine

Some people should not get chickenpox vaccine or should wait.
  • People should not get chickenpox vaccine if they have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose of chickenpox vaccine or to gelatin or the antibiotic neomycin.
  • People who are moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting chickenpox vaccine.
  • Pregnant women should wait to get chickenpox vaccine until after they have given birth. Women should not get pregnant for 1 month after getting chickenpox vaccine.
  • Some people should check with their doctor about whether they should get chickenpox vaccine, including anyone who:
    • Has HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system
    • Is being treated with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids, for 2 weeks or longer
    • Has any kind of cancer
    • Is getting cancer treatment with radiation or drugs
  • People who recently had a transfusion or were given other blood products should ask their doctor when they may get chickenpox vaccine.

Ask your provider for more information.

This information was taken directly from the Varicella VIS
(This information taken from Varicella VIS dated 3/13/08. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

Top of Page

Yellow Fever vaccine

Who should not get the yellow fever vaccine?
  • Anyone with a severe (life-threatening) allergy to any component of the vaccine, including eggs, chicken proteins, or gelatin, or who has had a severe allergic reaction to a previous dose of yellow fever vaccine should not get yellow fever vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Infants younger than 6 months of age should not get the vaccine.
  • Tell your doctor if:
    • You have HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system.
    • Your immune system is weakened as a result of cancer or other medical conditions, a transplant, or radiation or drug treatment (such as steroids, cancer chemotherapy, or other drugs that affect immune cell function).
    • Your thymus has been removed or you have a thymus disorder, such as myasthenia gravis, DiGeorge syndrome, or thymoma.

      Your doctor will help you decide whether you can receive the vaccine.

  • Adults 60 years of age and older who cannot avoid travel to a yellow fever area should discuss vaccination with their doctor. They might be at increased risk for severe problems following vaccination.
  • Infants 6 through 8 months of age, pregnant women, and nursing mothers should avoid or postpone travel to an area where there is risk of yellow fever. If travel cannot be avoided, discuss vaccination with your doctor.

If you cannot get the vaccine for medical reasons but require proof of yellow fever vaccination for travel, your doctor can give you a waiver letter if he considers the risk acceptably low. If you plan to use a waiver, you should also contact the embassy of the countries you plan to visit for more information.

This information was taken directly from the Yellow Fever VIS
(This information taken from Yellow Fever VIS dated 3/30/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

 

Top of Page

 

Images and logos on this website which are trademarked/copyrighted or used with permission of the trademark/copyright or logo holder are not in the public domain. These images and logos have been licensed for or used with permission in the materials provided on this website. The materials in the form presented on this website may be used without seeking further permission. Any other use of trademarked/copyrighted images or logos requires permission from the trademark/copyright holder...more

External Web Site Policy This graphic notice means that you are leaving an HHS Web site. For more information, please see the Exit Notification and Disclaimer policy.

 
Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    1600 Clifton Rd
    Atlanta, GA 30333
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
    Contact CDC-INFO
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
A-Z Index
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #