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About CDC's Division of Reproductive Health

Overview

image of family with an infantSafe motherhood begins before conception with proper nutrition and a healthy lifestyle and continues with appropriate prenatal care and the prevention and treatment of complications when possible. The ideal result is a full-term pregnancy without unnecessary interventions, the delivery of a healthy infant, and a healthy postpartum period in a positive environment that supports the physical and emotional needs of the woman, infant, and family. CDC provides technical assistance, consultation, and training worldwide to help others identify and address male and female reproductive issues, maternal health, and infant health issues. To better understand the burden of maternal complications and mortality and to decrease disparities among populations at risk of death and complications from pregnancy, CDC supports national and state-based surveillance systems to monitor trends and investigate health issues. CDC also conducts epidemiologic, behavioral, demographic, and health services research, and works with partners to translate research findings into health care practice, public health policy, and health promotion strategies.

CDC’s Division of Reproductive Health has about 200 staff, including several maternal and child health epidemiologists and research professionals in the field and a funding level in fiscal year 2014 of $42 million.

Goals


Improve women's reproductive health from menarche through menopause.

Improve pregnancy health and care.

Improve fetal, newborn, and infant health.

Priority Areas and Health Outcome Goals


Within each of the three main priority areas, the outcome goals further define how we will measure the outcomes and effects from our work.

image of 3 womenWomen's Reproductive Health
Improve women’s health from menarche through menopause.

  1. Increase the percentage of pregnancies that are intended.
  2. Increase the proportion of women of reproductive age who practice key preventive health behaviors.
  3. Integrate selected reproductive and non-reproductive health services.

image of a health provider with a patient

Pregnancy Health
Improve pregnancy health and care.

  1. Increase screening, prevention, and treatment for infections and chronic conditions before, during, and after pregnancy.
  2. Increase the proportion of women who practice behaviors that foster healthy pregnancies.
  3. Increase the number of countries and US states that use effective surveillance systems to monitor and review maternal deaths.

image of a health provider with a patientInfant Health
Improve fetal, newborn, and infant health.

  1. Reduce morbidity and mortality by reducing the burden of preterm birth.
  2. Reduce SUID (Sudden Unexplained Infant Death) through improved surveillance, and reduction of disparities.
  3. Improve the health of the fetus and newborn through optimal care before, during, and after pregnancy.

 

 
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