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Health Risks and Disparities Experienced by Hispanic Youth
Demographic Profile of Hispanics in the United States

  • The U.S. Census Bureau has estimated that in 2006
     

    • There were 44.3 million Hispanics living in the United States, representing more than 14% of the U.S. total population.1
    • 34% of Hispanics were under the age of 18, compared with 23% of non-Hispanic whites.1
    • 59.3% of Hispanics aged 25 years and older earned a high school diploma, compared with 86.1% of non-Hispanic whites.2
       
  • Based on 2006 data, Mexicans rank as the largest Hispanic subgroup, representing 66% of Hispanics in the United States. Other large subgroups include Puerto Ricans (8.6%), Central Americans (8.2%), and South Americans (6.0%).3
     

  • In 2006, the states with the largest number of Hispanics were California (13 million), Texas (8.4 million), Florida (3.6 million), New York (3.1 million), and Illinois (1.9 million).4
     

  • Other states with at least a half million Hispanic residents were Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Washington.4
     

  • 44% of New Mexico’s population is Hispanic, the highest of any state.4


Hispanic Students Attending Public Schools in the United States

  • The U.S. Census Bureau projects that by 2050, the number of Hispanic students aged 5-17 will increase by 166% (from 11 million students in 2006 to 28 million students in 2050). By comparison, an increase of 4% is projected for non-Hispanic students of the same age (from 43 million students in 2006 to 45 million students in 2050).5
     

  • In 2006, 70% of Hispanic students were enrolled in Kindergarten through 8th grade, compared with 66% of all non-Hispanic students in the same grades.5
     

  • In 2006, 84% of Hispanic public school students were born in the United States.5
     

  • Nearly 20% of all Hispanic public school students have difficulty speaking English.5
     

  • In 2006, the percentages of public school students who were Hispanic were, by region5
     

    • West (46%)
    • South (32%)
    • Northeast (12%)
    • Midwest (9%)


References

  1. U.S. Census Bureau. Annual estimates of the population by sex, age and race for the United States: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006(NC-EST2005-04); 2007.
     
  2. U.S. Census Bureau. Table 1a. Percent of high school and college graduates of the population 15 years and over by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin; 2006.
     
  3. U.S. Census Bureau. U.S. Hispanic population, 2006.  [pdf 283K].
     
  4. U.S. Census Bureau. Estimates of the population by race and Hispanic or Latino origin for the United States: July 1, 2006 (SC-EST2005-04); 2007.
     
  5. Fry R, Gonzales F. One-in-Five and Growing Fast: A Profile of Hispanic Public School Students. Washington, DC: Pew Hispanic Center; 2008.
     

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Page last reviewed: December 05, 2008
Page last modified: April 03, 2009
Content source: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health

Division of Adolescent and School Health
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Department of Health and Human Services